Azure Firewall DevSecOps in Azure DevOps

In this post, I will share the details for granting the least-privilege permissions to GitHub action/DevOps pipeline service principals for a DevSecOps continuous deployment of Azure Firewall.

Quick Refresh

I wrote about the design of the solution and shared the code in my post, Enabling DevSecOps with Azure Firewall. There I explained how you could break out the code for the rules of a workload and manage that code in the repo for the workload. Realistically, you would also need to break out the gateway subnet route table user-defined route (legacy VNet-based hub) and the VNet peering connection. All the code for this is shared on GitHub – I did update the repo with some structure and with working DevOps pipelines.

This Update

There were two things I wanted to add to the design:

  • Detailed permissions for the service principal used by the workload DevOps pipeline, limiting the scope of change that is possible in the hub.
  • DevOps pipelines so I could test the above.

The Code

You’ll find 3 folders in the Bicep code now:

  • hub: This deploys a (legacy) VNet-based hub with Azure Firewall.
  • customRoles: 4 Azure custom roles are defined. This should be deployed after the hub.
  • spoke1: This contains the code to deploy a skeleton VNet-based (spoke) workload with updates that are required in the hub to connect the VNet and route ingress on-prem traffic through the firewall.

DevOps Pipelines

The hub and spoke1 folders each contain a folder called .pipelines. There you will find a .yml file to create a DevOps pipeline.

The DevOps pipeline uses Azure CLI tasks to:

  • Select the correct Azure subscription & create the resource group
  • Deploy each .bicep file.

My design uses 1 sub for the hub and 1 sub for the workload. You are not glued to this bu you would need to make modifications to how you configure the service principal permissions (below).

To use the code:

  1. Create a repo in DevOps for (1 repo) hub and for (1 repo) spoke1 and copy in the required code.
  2. Create service principals in Azure AD.
  3. Grant the service principal for hub owner rights to the hub subscription.
  4. Grant the service principal for the spoke owner rights to the spoke subscription.
  5. Create ARM service connections in DevOps settings that use the service principals. Note that the names for these service connections are referred to by azureServiceConnection in the pipeline files.
  6. Update the variables in the pipeline files with subscription IDs.
  7. Create the pipelines using the .yml files in the repos.

Don’t do anything just yet!

Service Principal Permissions

The hub service principal is simple – grant it owner rights to the hub subscription (or resource group).

The workload is where the magic happens with this DevSecOps design. The workload updates the hub suing code in the workload repo that affects the workload:

  • Ingress route from on-prem to the workload in the hub GatewaySubnet.
  • The firewall rules for the workload in the hub Azure Firewall (policy) using a rules collection group.
  • The VNet peering connection between the hub VNet and the workload VNet.

That could be deployed by the workload DevOps pipeline that is authenticated using the workload’s service principal. So that means the workload service principal must have rights over the hub.

The quick solution would be to grant contributor rights over the hub and say “we’ll manage what is done through code reviews”. However, a better practice is to limit what can be done as much as possible. That’s what I have done with the customRoles folder in my GitHub share.

Those custom roles should be modified to change the possible scope to the subscription ID (or even the resource group ID) of the hub deployment. There are 4 custom roles:

  • customRole-ArmValidateActionOperator.json: Adds the CUSTOM – ARM Deployment Operator role, allowing the ARM deployment to be monitored and updated.
  • customRole-PeeringAdmin.json: Adds the CUSTOM – Virtual Network Peering Administrator role, allowing a VNet peering connection to be created from the hub VNet.
  • customRole-RoutesAdmin.json: Adds the CUSTOM – Azure Route Table Routes Administrator role, allowing a route to be added to the GatewaySubnet route table.
  • customRole-RuleCollectionGroupsAdmin.json: Adds the CUSTOM – Azure Firewall Policy Rule Collection Group Administrator role, allowing a rules collection group to be added to an Azure Firewall Policy.

Deploy The Hub

The hub is deployed first – this is required to grant the permissions that are required by the workload’s service principal.

Grant Rights To Workload Service Principals

The service principals for all workloads will be added to an Azure AD group (Workloads Pipeline Service Principals in the above diagram). That group is nested into 4 other AAD security groups:

  • Resource Group ARM Operations: This is granted the CUSTOM – ARM Deployment Operator role on the hub resource group.
  • Hub Firewall Policy: This is granted the CUSTOM – Azure Firewall Policy Rule Collection Group Administrator role on the Azure Firewalll Policy that is associated with the hub Azure Firewall.
  • Hub Routes: This is granted the CUSTOM – Azure Route Table Routes Administrator role on the GattewaySubnet route table.
  • Hub Peering: This is granted the CUSTOM – Virtual Network Peering Administrator role on the hub virtual network.

Deploy The Workload

The workload now has the required permissions to deploy the workload and make modifications in the hub to connect the hub to the outside world.

Deploying Azure ARM Templates From Azure DevOps – With A Complete Example

In this post, I will show you how to get those ARM templates sitting in an Azure DevOps repo deploying into Azure using a pipeline. With every merge, the pipeline will automatically trigger (you can disable this) to update the deployment. In other words, a complete CI/CD deployment where you manage your infrastructure/services as code.

Annoyance

I’m not a DevOps guru. I use DevOps every day. Every deployment I do for a customer runs from JSON that I’ve helped write into the customers’ Azure tenants. But we have people who are DevOps gurus and we have one seriously fancy deployment system that literally just uses a DevOps pipeline as a trigger mechanism and nothing more. But I use that, not develop it. I wanted to create & run a pipeline for my own needs (Cloud Mechanix Azure training). Admittedly, I’ve tried this before, lost patience, and abandoned it. This time, I persisted and succeeded.

What didn’t help? The dreadful Microsoft documentation. One doc, from DevOps was rubbish. Another had deprecated YAML code (pipelines are written in YAML). A third had an example that was full of errors. OK, let’s look at blogs. But as with many blogs on this topic, those few that were originals only showed how to push code into an existing App Service and the rest were copies and pastes of App Services posts or bad Microsoft examples.

When it comes to tech like this, I have the feeling that many who have the knowledge don’t like to share it.

Concept

What I’m dealing with here is infrastructure-as-code (Iac). The code (Azure JSON in ARM templates) will describe the resources and configurations of those resources that I want to deploy. In my example, it’s an Azure Firewall and its configuration, including the rules. I have created a repository (repo) in Azure DevOps and I edit the JSON using Visual Studio Code (VS Code), the free version of Visual Studio. When I make a change in VS Code, it will be done in a branch of the master copy of the code. I will sync that branch to the Cloud. To merge the changes, I will create a pull request. This pull request starts a change control process, where the owners of the repo can review the code and decide to accept or reject the changes. If the changes are accepted they are merged into the master copy of the code. And now the magic happens.

A pipeline is a description of a process that will take the master code from the repo and do stuff with it. In my case, deploy the code to a resource group in an Azure subscription. If the resources are already there, then the pipeline will do an update.

I will end up with an Azure Firewall that is managed as code. The rules and configuration are described in a parameter file so that’s all that I should normally need to touch. To make a rules change, I edit the parameter file and do a pull request. A security officer will review the change and approve/reject it. If the change is approved, the new firewall configuration will be deployed. And yes, this approach could probably be used with Azure Firewall Policy resources – I haven’t tested that yet. Now I can give people Read access only to my subscription and force all configuration changes through the pull request review process of Azure DevOps.

Your deployment can be any Azure resources that you can deploy using a template.

Azure Subscription

In Azure I have two resource groups:

  • [Resource Group] p-devops: Where I can do “DevOps stuff”
    • [Storage Account] pdevopsstorsjdhf983: I will use this to store access the code that I want to deploy using the pipeline
  • [Resource Group] p-we1fw: Where my hub virtual network is and the Azure Firewall will be
    • [Virtual Network]: p-we1fw-vnet: The virtual network that contains a subnet called AzureFirewallSubnet

Remember that storage account!

DevOps Repo

I created and configured a DevOps repo called AzureFirewall in a DevOps project. There are two files in there:

  • [Template] azurefirewall.json: The file that will deploy the Azure Firewall
  • [Parameter] azurefirewall-parameters.json: The configuration of the firewall, including the rules!

New DevOps Service Connection

DevOps will need a way to authenticate with your Azure tenant and get authorization to use your tenant, subscription, or resource group. You can get real fancy here. I’m going simple and using a feature of DevOps called a Service Connection, found in DevOps > [Project] >Project Settings > Service Connections (under Pipelines):

  1. Click New Service Connection
  2. Select Azure Resource Manager and hit Next
  3. Select Service Principal (Automatic) which is recommended by DevOps.
  4. Here I selected the subscription option and the Azure subscription that my resource groups are in.
  5. I granted access permission to all pipelines.
  6. I named the service connection after my subscription: p-we1net.

As I said, you can get real fancy here because there are lots of options.

New DevOps Pipeline

Now for the fun!

Back in the project, I went to Pipelines and created a new Pipeline:

  1. I selected Azure Repos Git because I’m storing my code in an Azure DevOps (Git) repo. The contents of this repo will be deployed by the pipeline.
  2. I selected my AzureFirewall repo.
  3. Then I selected “Starter Pipeline”.
  4. An editor appeared – now you’re editing a file called azure-pipelines.yml that resides in the root of your repo.

There is an option (instead of Starter Pipeline) where you choose an existing YAML file, maybe one from a folder called .pipelines in your repo.

Edit the Pipeline

Here is the code:

name: AzureFirewall.$(Date:yyyy.MM.dd)

trigger:
  batch: true

pool:
  name: Hosted Windows 2019 with VS2019

steps:
- task: AzureFileCopy@3
  displayName: 'Stage files'
  inputs:
    SourcePath: ''
    azureSubscription: 'p-we1net'
    Destination: 'AzureBlob'
    storage: 'pdevopsstorsjdhf983'
    ContainerName: 'AzureFirewall'
    outputStorageUri: 'artifactsLocation'
    outputStorageContainerSasToken: 'artifactsLocationSasToken'
    sasTokenTimeOutInMinutes: '240'
- task: AzureResourceGroupDeployment@2
  displayName: 'Deploy template'
  inputs:
     ConnectedServiceName: 'p-we1net'
     action: 'Create Or Update Resource Group'
     resourceGroupName: 'p-we1fw'
     location: 'westeurope'
     templateLocation: 'URL of the file'
     csmFileLink: '$(artifactsLocation)azurefirewall.json$(artifactsLocationSasToken)'
     csmParametersFileLink: '$(artifactsLocation)azurefirewall-parameters.json$(artifactsLocationSasToken)'
     deploymentMode: 'Incremental'
     deploymentName: 'AzureFirewall-Pipeline'

That is a working pipeline. It is made up of several pieces:

Trigger

This controls how the pipeline is started. You can set it to none to stop automatic executions – in the early days when you’re trying to get this right, automatic runs can be annoying.

Pool

Your pipeline is going to run in a container. I’m using a stock Microsoft container based on WS2019. You can supply your own container from Azure Container Registry, but that’s getting fancy!

Task: AzureFileCopy

Now we move into the Steps. The first task is to download the contents of the repo into a storage account. We need to do this because the following deployment task cannot directly access the raw files in Azure DevOps. A task is created with the human friendly name of Stage Files. There are a few settings to configure here:

  • azureSubscription: This is not the name of your subscription! Aint that tricky?! This is the name of the service connection that authenticates the pipeline against the subscription. So that’s my service connection called p-we1net, which I happened to name after my subscription.
  • storage: This is the storage account in my target Azure subscription in the p-devops resource group. My service connection has access to the subscription so it has access to the storage account – be careful with restricting access of the service connection to just a resource group and placing the staging storage account elsewhere.
  • ContainerName: This is the name of the container that will be created in your storage account. The contents of the repo will be downloaded into this container.
  • outputStorageUri: The URI/URL of the storage account/container will be stored in a variable which is called artifactsLocation in this example.
  • outputStorageContainerSasToken: A SAS token will be created to allow temporary secure access to the contents of the container. The token will be stored in a variable called artifactsLocationSasToken in this example.

Task: AzureResourceGroupDeployment

This task will take the contents of the repo from the storage account, and deploy them to a resource group in the target subscription. There are a few things to change:

  • azureSubscription: Once again, specify the name of the service connection, not the Azure subscription.
  • resourceGroupName: Enter the name of the target resource group.
  • location: Specify the Azure region that you are targeting.
  • csmFileLink: This is the URI of the template file that you want to deploy. More in a moment.
  • csmParametersFileLink: This is the URI of the parameters file that you want to deploy. More in a moment.
  • deploymentName: I have hard-set the deployment name so I don’t have to clean up versioned deployments from the resource group later. Every resource group has a hard set limit on deployment objects, and with a resource such as a firewall, that could be hit quite quickly.

csmFileLink

There are three parts to the string: $(artifactsLocation)azurefirewall.json$(artifactsLocationSasToken). Together, the three parts give the task secure access to the template file in the staging storage account.

  • $(artifactsLocation): This is the storage account/container URI/URL variable from the AzureFileCopy task.
  • azurefirewall.json: This is the name of the template file that I want to deploy.
  • $(artifactsLocationSasToken): This is the SAS token variable from the AzureFileCopy task.

csmParametersFileLink

There are three parts to the string: $(artifactsLocation)azurefirewall-parameters.json$(artifactsLocationSasToken). Together, the three parts give the task secure access to the parameter file in the staging storage account.

  • $(artifactsLocation): This is the storage account/container URI/URL variable from the AzureFileCopy task.
  • azurefirewall-parameters.json: This is the name of the parameter file that I want to use to customise the template deployment.
  • $(artifactsLocationSasToken): This is the SAS token variable from the AzureFileCopy task.

Pipeline Execution

There are three ways to run the pipeline now:

  1. Do an update (or a merge) to the master branch of the repo thanks to my trigger.
  2. Manually run the pipeline from Pipelines.
  3. Save a change to the pipeline in the DevOps editor if the master is not locked – which will trigger option 1, to be honest.

You can open the pipeline, or historic runs of it, to view/track the execution:

You’ll also get an email to let you know the status of an ended pipeline run:

Happy pipelining!